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I have this module:

enter image description here

My question pertains specifically to the RX and TX pins shown (sorry for having it upside down, only way I could make it look clear.)

I don't understand why there are 4 pins, for 2 signals. I would like to use this module to send information to my FPGA (DE0-nano), using an IP core that implements UART-RS232. However I do not know how to connect the two.

If some of those pins are ground, how do I know which ones? It is not labeled.

This thing was originally used to program a PIC through the computer, by the way.

Thanks.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you have a part or model number for the module? \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 19 '14 at 3:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can't you just trace where the pins are connected? \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany May 19 '14 at 4:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ No I do not have any information about the module. I think I just solved it. I connect a jumper to activate the connection between the 2 pins, to use RX or TX. Ground is available in 3 of the 28 sockets that the PIC would normally be embedded into. \$\endgroup\$ – thejohnny May 19 '14 at 5:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ If you have the solution, you are encouraged to post it as an answer your own question. It'll help future answer-seekers, plus it'll give people the opportunity to upvote the solution :) \$\endgroup\$ – bitsmack May 19 '14 at 7:25
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Found it out:

I connect a jumper to activate the connection between the 2 pins, to use RX or TX. Ground is available in 3 of the 28 sockets that the PIC would normally be embedded into.

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