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I got my hands on a big tube of conductive silicone. I've never heard of it before, but my first thought was, "Is this just basically wire in a tube?" Has anyone ever used this before? Can you just apply it as a low heat solder? The people I got it from said this stuff is kinda expensive, but I got it since they were just going to get rid of it (at cost, so they were glad to let me have it). Plus it is expired (does silicone expire?).

Anyway, anyone have any experience using the stuff?

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Well, I had some fun with some conductive paint, which should be similar to your thing. First of all, check resistance of the 'wire' of it.

The main problem is reliability of lines. Also, it should not be able to physically hold elements in place, unlike solder.

Might be used to repair broken traces on PCB and especially, flexible PCB (cellphones, keyboards).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh, good point about testing the resistance. Thanks for the answer! \$\endgroup\$ – Jeshii Mar 10 '11 at 1:33
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I would guess that it is normally used as a seal for metal enclosures, to get a very good shield against electromagnetic interference. Since it is silicone it would also be a good seal against water or other substances.

As for using it as instant wires I don't think silicone would stick well enough to other electronics to be useful.

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