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I'm working on a custom charging station rack which would allow me to charge 3 of my tablets simultaneously. I already have the rack and adapters setup for the tablets but it requires 3 different outlet plugs. I am looking into combining these into a single plug by wiring each adapter in parallel with the wall outlet. I never have strayed far from battery and microcontroller power sources before so in my mind household power is no different but surely the 120V is nothing to scuff with so my confidence is weary.

Would running multiple adapters in parallel actually work as I expect it? What would then be the best path to achieve this? What about if I ever want to extend to more devices? Any regulations or additional safety precautions for the circuit?

I live in the US and two of the adapters are the standard 5V-2A transformer, the other one is also not far off.

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closed as off-topic by Matt Young, Kaz, Daniel Grillo, Rev1.0, JYelton Jun 23 '14 at 22:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Matt Young, Kaz, Daniel Grillo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't get it. It sounds as if you need a simple multi-outlet power strip / multi-socket? Please clarify what you want to achieve. \$\endgroup\$ – Rev1.0 Jun 23 '14 at 12:58
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There are multiple outlet strips, commonly called "Power Bars" that usually provide six outlets, and plug into a single standard outlet. These things should be readily available at hardware stores, Home Depot, and similar places.

There is no problem using multiple cell-phone chargers and similar devices in a power bar, but you can't use them to run multiple electric heaters, or other power-hungry devices.

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Wiring in parallel is how all house electrical connections work. Even power strips. Notice the three copper channels.

enter image description here

That said, your better off going with a small power strip than you are wiring something yourself. 120V can and will kill you, and set things on fire. IF you don't follow the electrical code, you can go to jail for the results. If it's not a Underwriter's Approved setup, your insurance will tell you to pound sand, etc etc.

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