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I am designing a circuit in that I need 1:1 and fly-back transformers at low frequency (0-100kHz) and high temperature. Can anyone help me with these?

I am looking for voltage being handled around 12V, if possible at 175-200°C, with same voltage isolation.

I need fly-back transformer to buy from the market but not to design.

I found this one but not useful in my application transformer link

I found 1:1 transformer for my application at BHelectronics 1:1 transformer.

I am looking for one more transformer at same temperature which can provide +10v/-10v power supply from battery.

I need to get +/- power supply to my electronics from the battery. I am trying to find a transformer to do this job. Can anyone help me with this kind of transformer.

I can't disclose my application, i am sorry about it!.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You MUST give more information. The question cannot be answered sensibly at present. What voltage in? What power level? What application? How high a temperature? Telling us what you are trying to achieve will VERY VERY greatly assist us in getting you a good answer. If you do not do tghis asap the knpckers, knackers and all will put the question omn hold and make it MUCH harder to help you. \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Jun 30 '14 at 11:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ The 'death by 1000 installments' information provision is not a good way to get answers. NOW you mention "they" and RM5 transformers and replacing existing equipment. If you want a good answer please provide a complete statement of what your 'problem' is. Where are the electronics no?, is the existing solution cooled? why cannot you use the existing solutio, are you trying to emulate an existing commercial design that you do not have the rights to* etc. - NOTE * functionally emulating another company's design can be perfectly OK. But we need to know exactly what you are doing and why. \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Jun 30 '14 at 12:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @RussellMcMahon the existing solution was designed only upto 80 degree temp now i am redesigning it for high temp purpose. I am looking for high temp components. \$\endgroup\$
    – verendra
    Jun 30 '14 at 12:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ OK - I'll leave it to others to answer the rest. I'd like to help but I'm not going to waste time with little by little add ons and find out (as almost always happens in such cases) that some highly relevant and critical material was missed out and much of the work put into answering has been wasted. If you are prepared to make a complete and clear statement of the requirement I'd love to join with others in giving you a good answer. But until "it's all there" I'll bow out. Note eg ... \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Jun 30 '14 at 13:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ ... || Why is the example transformer you give unsuitable? - we'd have to guess. Maybe its just the 1:8 turns ratio. Maybe something else. You say you need 1:1 but do not say why. You may be right and you may not. You may be able to redesign around an 1:N part and have it work OK - or you may not be able to change the circuit. You do not say. We do not know. People's time is wasted. Ask a good question and you will probably get a good answer. || Power level - asked but not answered. Application? - it may matter. 1:1? - it may not be necessary. | ??? - ??? \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Jun 30 '14 at 13:03
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This "solution" will be updated as required information becomes available.

You MUST give more information.
The question cannot be answered sensibly at present.

  • Do you want flyback transformer design information or circuit information?

  • What research have you done so far?

  • What voltage in?

  • What power level?

  • What application?

  • How high a temperature?

Telling us what you are trying to achieve will VERY VERY greatly assist us in getting you a good answer.


Temperature:

Temperature MUST be specified.

  • If using ferrite the material curie point is a major factor in maximum temperature.

  • If using iron core the insulation is liable to be a major factor.

  • If using powdered iron core - usually the material of choice at significant power levels - the core lifetime will be affected by elevated temperatures.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I am looking at 12v voltage in and with same voltage isolation, 175-200 degree centigrade temp range. before they are using RM5 transformer so i need to replace it with new one. \$\endgroup\$
    – verendra
    Jun 30 '14 at 12:02
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200°C should be OK for most magnetic materials, but of course check the datasheet. The curie point of iron, for example, is about 770°C.

The real problem will be the rest of the circuit. Silicon stops being a semiconductor at around 150°C, so you're not going to find any that operate at 200°C. Perhaps there is some exotic semiconductor that works at that temperature, but availability of parts will be very low and prices very high. Vacuum tubes might work, but your best option is probably active cooling of the circuit.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes your are right, price is not the important factor for me but only avalibility at high temp or i need to use active cooling as you said. \$\endgroup\$
    – verendra
    Jun 30 '14 at 12:07
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There are circuits that operate at such temperatures for geophysical instrumentation, but their lives are brutish and short. Although they are available as standard, the performance is fairly miserable at temperature, and the cost is perhaps 100 or 1000 times higher than standard parts.

Look for transformers made with polyimide (Kapton) insulation.

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