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I've seen in some IC's the name of it is 'printed' on the top side. But in some IC's the names are 'punched',they have impressions on the IC. And in some cases, a 'Sticker or a Label' has been 'pasted' on the IC. What is the difference between these types of Naming methods? does these 3 types differs in quality? or somewhat...

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Uh, stickered? Really? \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 8 '14 at 3:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ Stickers may be used on programmable parts such as EPROMS and microcontrollers to indicate the program stored in the part. If you peel off the sticker, you will usually find the manufacturer's part number laser engraved or printed on the part. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Jul 8 '14 at 3:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Less likely to be punched than it is laser etched. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Jul 8 '14 at 4:13
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There shouldn't be any difference in the performance of the part, so no difference in the quality or the operation.

If you want to get super super technical about it, I guess a part with a punched plastic package would have different thermal dissipation properties over the printed parts but only on the most minute order.

To be honest though, if you bought parts from china or something that are stickered, I would be skeptical of counterfeit parts. Although counterfeiters have capabilities to etch and print as well.

TL;DR: Buy from reputable suppliers

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    \$\begingroup\$ A colleague of mine got a batch of counterfeit Maxim parts. They were laser etched and everything, only the font was different :) Oh, and a lot of them failed, too... \$\endgroup\$ – bitsmack Jul 8 '14 at 4:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yea, a colleague of mine bought "op amps" that were etched and such but had nothing inside them. Just straight up plastic. \$\endgroup\$ – Funkyguy Jul 8 '14 at 5:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hmm. That actually makes more sense than the "Maxims" with the high failure rate. I wonder if the counterfeiters got a hold of a bad production run, or something... \$\endgroup\$ – bitsmack Jul 8 '14 at 6:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ The folks over at sparkfun got a bunch of "Atmel" chips a while back that ended up being non-production silicon of a completely different part (buck power supply controller, IIRC). Very strange indeed! \$\endgroup\$ – alex.forencich Jul 8 '14 at 7:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yea I remember reading about that! They also got some counterfeit NXP(?) chips, I can't remember specifically its happened more than once. Counterfeit chips are more common then one would think. \$\endgroup\$ – Funkyguy Jul 8 '14 at 14:01

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