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I have a picture here, sorry if it's ugly .. but let's think, they are my ESCs for my mini-quadcopter. My mini quadcopter is 3d printed, and as much as possible, I don't want to use bullet connectors because they will only add to the weight of my mini-quad. My question is, from the diagram below, will all the ESCs get the same voltage or not? Especially on the left diagran ... The right diagram was using a power distribution board from hobbyking

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thicker wires means better/more even distribution of the power voltage. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jul 9, 2014 at 8:09

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All the ESCs will get the same voltage in both circuits because they are electrically identical: the 4 ESCs and the battery are connected in parallel in both cases.

Since you have a parallel circuit, you can assume that the voltage will be the same always in all the elements of the circuit unless you are working with very high currents, long wires or high frequency, which is not your case.

If you want a light weight solution, I would recommend just to solder the 4 ESC positive wires together without any connector or distribution board. Do the same for the 4 ESC negative wires. Then add a connector to the joints to be able to change the battery. And it will work perfectly. The circuit will be like the following one:


schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Happy flying! :)

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Both drawings are the same parallel circuit. Just solder all the wires for each pole together and it will be the same.

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Although other losses could be present, yes. You're supposed to get the same voltage on all four, since you connected it in paralell. On the other hand, the current that is supplied by the batteries will be divided though. Since the components aren't ideal, there may be differences from the expected values.

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It depends on the wire and how powerful your motors are. For a large system, a 15A ESC will cause a drop of 0.4V/metre in 16AWG wire, or 3.6% of your battery, so whatever topology you use keep the wires the same length of each other. The PCB with a ring is an easy way to ensure this, equivalent to a star ground in PCB design. A tree such as in ferrangb's suggestion will ensure that the ESCs see slightly different voltages - ESC4's wire to the branch with ESC3 is longer. As in level flight, no motor can go faster than the least performant motor, you will get a loss in performance corresponding to one percent every twenty-seven centimetres of difference.

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