0
\$\begingroup\$

This will be my first DIY project involving electricity so I want to make sure I buy the correct components. I'm purchasing a used telescoping column (aluminum and steel, 4000n) that has two actuators hidden within, with two cords coming out the black and red wires within each cord.

Each requires a 24V 3.5A power supply, so I assume I would need a 24V 7+ amp power supply... but then when I Google around, all I get are these crazy looking power supplies with 10-15 different connectors on one side. When I look at the 12V power supplies it's simple... they look like battery chargers, cut off the end and strip the wires, make sure it's the right amperage before I do that obviously, and bam you're done.

Can someone help me figure out what a good beginner-friendly store or brand would be? I am not asking for shopping brand advice, but for safety advice. I don't want to buy something that's going to blow up in my face or electrocute me.

I would prefer something super simple, or a link to a great guide about power supplies (all I could find was some really old information).

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

There's nothing wrong with a power supply that has 10-15 connections; that's actually fairly typical for supplies in this class. You just need to understand what they're for.

For the power input, there will be connections for line, neutral and ground. There might be a separate "frame ground".

For the output, there will be at least one pair of output terminals (maybe more), possibly a pair of "remote sense" terminals (which help compensate for voltage drops in the wiring), and possibly terminals for remote adjustment or load-sharing.

The datasheet for the power supply should show how to hook it up for various application scenarios.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

7A @ 24V is good bit of power. Not dangerously high, but enough current to melt stuff if you're not careful. If the supply you select doesn't have a fuse, add one.

I have used and liked TDK Power supplies. They're good quality, safe and reasonably priced. The one linked is a closed-frame type with screw terminals for connection and plastic guards over the terminals to prevent accidental contact with the incoming 120VAC. It's a good choice, but not hobbyist friendly pricing.

This is a semi-open frame supply at about half the price. I am not familiar with the manufacturer, but it's cheap, so worth a try. You need to take more care than with the TDK supply since the electronics are exposed, but that should be obvious.

Since you don't really need a precise 24VDC to power an actuator, I've always wondered why some manufacturer didn't make the digital equivalent of a power transformer. A high power isolated fixed duty-cycle switch (e.g., 10:1 for approx. 12VDC) that simply rectified and stepped down the incoming AC signal and produced a filtered DC that is "close enough." However, as I think about it, the only part missing from a fully regulated switching supply would be the actual regulation circuitry, so there wouldn't be much cost savings to be had. Guess I just answered my own question :-)

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.