1
\$\begingroup\$

My local public libraries are switching to RFID tags for check-in/check-out. I'd like to get a RFID reader to read these tags myself, but I don't know what I need.

The stickers they put in books don't have any markings, but the ones on CDs say StingRay on them, and appear to be the 3M StingRay Full Disc RFID Tag. I assume that the stickers in books are the same electronically, just a different form factor. I think this is a 13.56MHz system, but I'm not sure.

What kind of reader do I need for these tags? (Bonus question: What kind of data is stored on these tags? Just a serial number, or is there more?)

\$\endgroup\$
8
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why don't you speak to your local library and ask them if they can advise you of what they use. At least then you are better armed to solve the problem. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jul 16 '14 at 18:38
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Typically RFID is just a serial number. It was originally intended as an alternative to barcodes. It may be possible that some information is stored on it, but I would guess it's unlikely. What are you hoping to get out of having your own reader? \$\endgroup\$
    – kjgregory
    Jul 16 '14 at 18:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka, the library staff could probably tell me who they bought it from, but I doubt they know any technical specs. And I doubt their vendor is interested in selling a single reader to an individual. \$\endgroup\$
    – cjm
    Jul 16 '14 at 18:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KGregory, it's mostly curiosity. But I also have a database I use to track my library checkouts, and a reader could make it quicker to record those. \$\endgroup\$
    – cjm
    Jul 16 '14 at 18:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ The library staff should be able to show you the "reader" and you could glean some information from that unless, of course you are planning some kind of "wrong-doing" and you wish to remain anonymous LOL. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jul 16 '14 at 18:53
1
\$\begingroup\$

Library systems with RFID are usually built around ISO15693 standard. Desktop readers for this standard are relatively cheap (100$). Some libraries prefer to use UID of the tag for identification and some prefer to encode an internal unique ID in the tag (that is usually binded to the UID of the tag). In both cases by buying a reader you won't get any spectacular results just an ID which you can usually find inscribed on the book. For data stored on the tag, that depends on the library. A few years ago there where a few standards for encoding (like the French encoding, the Danish, etc.) Last year I believe ISO28560 was approved but I do not know which libraries adopted it. For information stored you can have this or a combination of this: Unique ID EAS or AFI (security) CollectionID HandlingCode: can't be borrowed, special care, rare book, etc. ISO15693 has usually 1024 bytes of user memory so any other information could be stored. If you need a recommendation for the reader check IdTronic desktop readers.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.