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I'm currently making a very simple Tic-Tac-Toe game with an AT89C51RC2 and I am having issues getting the button input right.

Basically, the input is a 3x3 Button Matrix which I want to utilize by scanning through the rows with a pulse while checking the columns for a connection; pretty basic. However, the way I wanted to do this was by making a unique scroll method that received the row parameter and set it to HIGH accordingly.

I already have

sbit R1 = P1^0; 

all through the needed inputs, but I'm not sure if this is correct.

Then, on my main method, I run something like

while(TRUE)
{
    scroll(R1);
}

which is named scroll, I have this

void scroll (bit P)
{
   P = HIGH; //Sets the row being checked to HIGH (HIGH is already defined as a 1). Same goes with the aformentioned TRUE
   ...
}

So, this is not working. I know I'm not doing this right, but I had to start somewhere. Is what I am attempting to do possible? Sending a single Pin adress as an overload for a method? If so, what datatype should it be? I was juggling between char and bit but I can't settle.

I hope my question is understandable! If not, I will gladly elaborate and maybe post all the code (although it is quite messy). Thanks, everyone, in advance!

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Edit: I changed code example to answer your question much better

I never used that chip, but it looks like a 8 bit variant of the 8051, so I would make the following guess: your port are defined as "sfr". Usually your MCU header file contains definitions such as :

sfr P1=0x90;

As per your chip's datasheet on page 5, P1 is at address 0x90. So that means that you could write something like that:

unsigned char scroll(sbit pin);

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
 sbit pinMap[3]={P0^6,P0^7,P1^0}; // P0.6, P0.7 and P1.0.
 char keyboardRows[3]; // Keyboard layout is: one row per byte.  Column are mapped on 0 to 2.
 int i;

 while(1)
 {
  for(i=0;i<3;++i)
  {
   scroll(pinMap[i]);
  }
 }

 return 0;
}

unsigned char scroll(sbit pin)
{
 unsigned char rowState;
 pin=1; // or HIGH.

 // Save your column state in rowState here.

 pin=0; // or LOW?

 return rowState;
}

Now, an you didn't say what kind of problem you were having. We need more information to help you out.

  1. Is it software or could it be hardware? software

  2. What kind of error are you getting? I'm still not sure other than it doesn't work

  3. It doesn't compile? It is fine.

  4. It doesn't do what you expect? I still don't know what you get vs. what you expect.

  5. Is it a custom matrix? Yes and it works.

  6. Is so, have you used pull up resistors to set a definite state when the buttons are not pressed? It's ok.

  7. Have to put diode to prevent ghost keys to appear (when pressing many keys at once)? It's ok.

Edit: Ok, your compiler don't like sbit as parameter, so one may try this:

unsigned char scroll(unsigned char* port,unsigned char pin);

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
 unsigned char* portAddr={&P0,&P1,&P2}; // Put whatever here.
 unsigned char pin[3]={0x40,0x80,0x01}; // P0.6, P0.7 and P1.0.
 char keyboardRows[3]; // Keyboard layout is: one row per byte.  Column are mapped on 0 to 2.
 int i;

 while(1)
 {
  for(i=0;i<3;++i)
  {
   scroll(portAddr[i],pinMap[i]);
  }
 }

 return 0;
}

unsigned char scroll(unsigned char* port,unsigned char pin)
{
 unsigned char rowState;
 *port|=pin; // Let the bus weak pull-up pull the bus up.

 // Save your column state in rowState here.

 *port&=~pin; // Drive low the output.

 return rowState;
}

If you really insist on using sbit and such things, you could make the declaration global such as this:

sbit RowPins[3]={P0^6,P0^7,P1^0};

unsigned char scroll(int rowIndex);

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
 char keyboardRows[3]; // Keyboard layout is: one row per byte.  Column are mapped on 0 to 2.
 int i;

 while(1)
 {
  for(i=0;i<3;++i)
  {
   scroll(i);
  }
 }

 return 0;
}

unsigned char scroll(int rowIndex)
{
 RowPins[i]=HIGH;

 // Read stuff here and put in "column".

 RowPins[i]=LOW;

 return column;
}
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much for taking the time to answer and researching. Although the program is compiling, it's not doing what I would want it to do. I guess the more solid question is: Now that I've already donde sbit R1 = P0^0, what is R1's data type? I want to know so I can use R1 as a parameter in a method. As stated in the problem, I want to do this so I can run a "scroll" method which scans the columns with the same method, once for R1, once for R2 and once for R3. \$\endgroup\$ – BretonDP Jul 17 '14 at 7:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, the resistors and ghosting thing is sorted, the button matrix is made with spst push buttons. The only issue I have is with this piece of code. \$\endgroup\$ – BretonDP Jul 17 '14 at 7:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BretonDP I edited my answer to reflect new information provided. \$\endgroup\$ – Mishyoshi Jul 17 '14 at 16:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ I see! So basically, you sent an sbit as the argument, which is what I was trying to achieve, and then used sbit again as the parameter. I tried doing so, but it wouldn't let me make scroll receive an sbit for some reason. I will try to make a piece of code similar to you, arrays and all, and give it a try. Thank you very much! \$\endgroup\$ – BretonDP Jul 17 '14 at 19:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Miyoshi I have attempted to follow your code, but it seems that sbit cannot be used within functions or as parameters. \$\endgroup\$ – BretonDP Jul 17 '14 at 20:37

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