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I've been lurking around the net for days trying to find a Slimline SATA to mSATA\microSATA adapter, the only one remotely related is the laptop optical bay HDD\SSD enclosure which I already have and use for a full sized SATA HDD. I'm curios of this because I have a 15" mobo in a 17" PC which results in having a spare Slimline SATA connector on my mobo and an extended one used by the HDD\SSD enclosure.

I'd appreciate answers to any of these questions:

1) Is it possible to make a female Slimline SATA to female mSATA adapter for SSD?

2) Is it possible to make a female Slimline SATA to female microSATA adapter for SSD?

3) If either one can be made, what voltages could it output?

4) If either one can be made, how small could it be?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you clarify what exactly you mean by "slimline SATA"? do you mean 2.5 inch 9.5mm? 2.5 inch 7mm? something else? \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Green Feb 5 '18 at 15:14
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1) Is it possible to make a female Slimline SATA to female mSATA adapter for SSD?

I believe this is possible. The Slimilne SATA uses a 5V power input alone. I'm not sure, but I think that the mSATA uses 5V as well as 3.3V You would have to implement a 5V to 3.3V regulator.

2) Is it possible to make a female Slimline SATA to female microSATA adapter for SSD?

See response for #1

3) If either one can be made, what voltages could it output?

See response for #1

4) If either one can be made, how small could it be?

Entirely depends on the skill of the engineer who lays out the board and also the power supply. You obviously need space for the two connectors. You'll also need the power supply on the board.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "You'll also need the power supply on the board" could you clarify that? Also could you point me in a direction to make this device possible? (From a brief look at your website it seems that you might know) \$\endgroup\$ – UltimateRT Jul 23 '14 at 15:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sure, So you'll have 5 volts coming in on the slimline connector. the mSATA and microSATA require both 5V and 3.3V, so you can send 5V into a regulator. I'm not sure how much current hard drives actually pull but if they are more than 2A, you will need a switching mode power supply. Other than that, you can use a simple LDO regulator unless you need a very efficient regulator. \$\endgroup\$ – Funkyguy Jul 23 '14 at 15:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would first point you to digi-key, find the connectors that fit your application. Once you have done that, figure out your power supply situation. Once you've done that, it has come time to create the circuit and subsequently the circuit board. I believe SATA uses differential pairs so you'll need to route the SATA connections parallel and length-matched, like USB connections. You can get your board fabricated from people like OSHpark \$\endgroup\$ – Funkyguy Jul 23 '14 at 15:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for all the great info. Though I've learned a lot about these subjects over the years, I highly doubt myself designing electronics. Now I just need someone to design a circuit board for me... \$\endgroup\$ – UltimateRT Jul 23 '14 at 15:49

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