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It's a while that in the internet I'm finding schematics with hand-made pencil drawing style. I've tried to search a little bit for the software used to make them but I didn't find it.

Any advice?

Here some examples:

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

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closed as off-topic by Andy aka, Leon Heller, Vladimir Cravero, Rev1.0, Daniel Grillo Aug 6 '14 at 11:36

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    \$\begingroup\$ Whenever I see a hand drawn circuit with scribbled values I think "prototype" or even "unproven" so, I'm wondering why? Is it just aesthetics (somehow?). Maybe writing values in Roman numerals is also something to consider - a 47 ohm resistor would become \$IIIL\Omega\$ and a 68ohm \$LXVIII\Omega\$ \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Aug 6 '14 at 8:03
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    \$\begingroup\$ I suppose the kids will be asking where they can get this wiggly font they saw on grandpa's old personal letters. Clearly, there is no other way. \$\endgroup\$ – Samuel Aug 6 '14 at 8:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Andy - "Nothing good can come of a mixture of Latin and Greek" (Lord Reith, first Director General of the BBC ... on Television). \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Aug 6 '14 at 9:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ The second example above is from ecs.umass.edu/ece/m5/tutorials/tip122_transistor_tutorial.html - Wow! - look at that breadboard layout!. So tidy! And many more like it. A superb example overaall here - such art is seldom seen any more - at least, certainly not on my workbench :-(. \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Aug 6 '14 at 9:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't believe these are generated by software. If you look closely at the second diagram, notice that in "TIP122", the 2's are slightly different. Also the "1" in "R 1KΩ" and "TIP122" has a different angle. In the third diagram, the two T's in "OUTPUT" are slightly different. I conclude these are very skillfully hand-drawn. \$\endgroup\$ – JYelton Aug 6 '14 at 16:00
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Those look like they were actually drawn with either a schematic stencil or very carefully by hand.

"By hand" is something people used to do before software. With practice, the art can be learned, but that's time consuming and lame. Just make a schematic in Visio and then apply a sketch filter with Photoshop.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Time consuming, aye. Lame? Some may so say. Indeed, some do. But methinks Andy's 'aesthetics" would more often be closer to the mark. And (while Olin may tell you otherwise :-)), you can by no means judge the quality of the technical advice offered from the drawing style or "quality". FWIW, as you suggest, the diagrams above were almost certainly hand drawn. If not, the program has a de-optimiser to change fine detail to create variation. \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Aug 6 '14 at 8:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ I forgot my sarcasm tags. I'm still proud of my carefully hand drawn schematics from school and personal projects. It is a fading art though, there isn't a place for much more than sketches in the workplace, just the kind you draw before fiddling with the software. \$\endgroup\$ – Samuel Aug 6 '14 at 8:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Couldn't you have suggested a program (even) dearer than Visio? :-). | FWIW I'm a holdout with hand drawn diagrams for simple circuits. Alas, nobody would ever mistake mine for machine drawn ones. \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Aug 6 '14 at 8:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ That's drawn by hand for sure, have a close look at the three earth symbols in the third sheet: they all differ. \$\endgroup\$ – Vladimir Cravero Aug 6 '14 at 9:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ I agree with Russell here. Hand-drawn diagrams may be time-consuming, but I wouldn't call them lame. Obviously for commercial production, hand-drawn schematics are not viable, but they have an aesthetic quality that might sometimes be appropriate for the "hand crafted" things prevalent among hobbyists and makers. \$\endgroup\$ – JYelton Aug 6 '14 at 15:56

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