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I need to create a high current (~2A) connection between multiple closely stacked PCBs. Signal connections are made using a 0.5mm pitch, 4mm stack height mezzantine connector with a individual pin current rating of only 300mA. Using this connector to carry the 2A and associated ground would consume a lot of pins.

Therefore I am looking for alternative connectors that are both stackable and have higher current rating. I am considering spring contacts (both of pogo-type and simple metal latches) but wonder how well those will function when the PCB is subject to vibrations. Can someone share his/her experience? Note that those contacts should carry power, not signals.

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    \$\begingroup\$ There are lots of connector companies out there who have already solved problems like this, including Amp, Hirose, JST, Molex and Samtec, to name just a few. Have you looked through any of their catalogs before asking here? Or done a parametric search through a distributor such as Arrow, Digi-Key, Future or Mouser? How did you select the connector you're using for the signals? BTW, there's nothing wrong with using 6-8 pins to carry power and/or ground -- the redundancy gives you a lot of resilience against vibration. You probably want a lot of ground pins anyway for signal integrity. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Aug 13 '14 at 15:04
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If you have a vibration spec you are working to (for example, a relay might be rated to be fully functional under 10 to 55 Hz at double amplitude of 1.6 mm), you can probably mathematically guesstimate the vibration it would take to reduce the force (say) to half the nominal force. If you don't exactly know the mass of the sprung part, you can overestimate it to be safe. I suspect you'll be fine. Mechanical shock is another matter, but if you have a bit of capacitance maybe you'll be able to weather that without a glitch.

I base my optimism partly on the wide use of pogo-pin type connectors for DSLR batteries, cell phone batteries and such like. As Dave Tweed comments, there are no doubt detailed specifications available for parts used in these applications.

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I think you're answering your own question! You feel funny using spring contacts in a vibrating environment. I would too (at least the pogo type, and I don't quite know what "simple metal latches" are), because with those pins, geometrical concerns are important and I don't know how well I can brace things. I'd also worry that over long use, spring mechanisms might "gum up", the pins would leave the pads during vibration, and sort of ooze back into place over time, or leave a gap, perhaps arcing in the interim.

I'd look into other options to figure out what "feels better", or perhaps take a moment to dwell on why you believe that pogo pins are the perfect solution, good enough to make you risk a failure mode.

Certainly, it MIGHT be fine, but do you really need to put the effort into figuring it out when there are other options that you KNOW will work?

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