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Please help me explain why the efficiency of the wire does not follow a distinct path (ie R^2 value is low).

Graph 1 Efficiency of wire vs current: http://postimg.org/image/p49bzm4ab/

Is is to do with non-linear relationship between resistance and efficiency (see link below)?

Graph 2: Change in temperature vs wire efficiency

http://postimg.org/image/t3oihsb6p/

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please explain "efficiency of the wire". \$\endgroup\$ – Dzarda Aug 21 '14 at 10:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ The power in/ the power out *100% \$\endgroup\$ – Ashmar Barbour Aug 21 '14 at 10:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Given that definition, I'd like to have some of the wire you tested. It is showing 180% efficiency - free power. I would say you've got some kind of error in your measuring or in your math. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Aug 21 '14 at 10:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ How are you measuring power in and power out? Can you draw a schematic, or post a photo of the schematic? \$\endgroup\$ – gbulmer Aug 21 '14 at 10:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am measuring the power left after passing through the wire. The maximum efficiency is not 180% but the axes do extend to past 100% as it has two y axis. Here is a table of data found : postimg.org/image/70do12cst \$\endgroup\$ – Ashmar Barbour Aug 21 '14 at 10:54

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