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I have worked out that that the Remote pin works like the Green "Power Supply On (active low)" wire on an ATX supply, and found a wiki on remote sensing about it being used to get diagnostics on the power-supply (if I understand correctly)

Now I have a little red wire that does nothing, with .5V on it. I am viewing pins 1 and 5 on This

Just curious, Is it perhaps simply a case of leaving a wire in because the standard connector/wire has X terminals and axials? It is called the "Reserved" pin, and other sites cite it as a second "Remote pin" even though it does not activate the power supply.

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Generally "Reserved" means you are not supposed to use it. The manufacturer may in future decide on an official function for that pin which may not correspond to how you think it could be used now.

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It is usual in power supplies that a "remote" connection is used to control the voltage more precisely but providing a low current feedback of the voltage at the load. This allows the power supply to sense the voltage drop across the cable (\$ I * R_{cable}\$) and to correct for it. In your case it is not clear which supply (there are two voltages and one sense) it should be associated with.

But it could also be an unconventional use of the term as well in this power supply.

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