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Could anyone please explain the working of so called 'peaking inductors'? I know they are used to enhance the bandwidth but how do they do this?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Iq. provide links to relavent material so that bettter information can be provided. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kortuk
    Apr 10, 2011 at 19:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well I am sharing the link for a paper which I am reading right now where this peaking inductance has been used. \$\endgroup\$
    – HasIq.
    Apr 11, 2011 at 7:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ amsacta.cib.unibo.it/1039/1/GA042711.PDF \$\endgroup\$
    – HasIq.
    Apr 11, 2011 at 7:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ The peaking inductance is used in the design of an active balun for the Gilbert cell mixer. \$\endgroup\$
    – HasIq.
    Apr 11, 2011 at 8:22

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This seems to be a way of improving the performance of analog high-frequency (GHz range) integrated circuits. Too bad that all the articles I found about this topic are behind a IEEE paywall. I think I could download them at my former University if there is interest in more details about this technique.

The basic bandwidth limitation of many circuits is the low pass RC filter formed by the resistance of the signal source (which may be a transmission line which "looks" like a resistance) and the input capacitance of an amplifier circuit.

By adding some inductance the input capacitance can be brought to resonance and "neutralized". If you choose the right inductance value you can place the resonant frequency (and the peak of the LC characteristic from which this technique takes its name) near the low pass frequency limit of the original circuit to boost the signal amplitude a little and therefore improve the bandwidth.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hey thx a lot! Clears the air a bit! \$\endgroup\$
    – HasIq.
    Apr 11, 2011 at 7:59

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