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How can this 5V 3W power supply board be mounted and electrically connected to a custom designed PCB?

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Or will it be better to get this power supply board instead due to the right angled pins which I am guessing can be soldered to the main PCB providing both mechanical and electrical connections? But I need 3W off the 5V rail, which this unit cannot seem to provide (only provides 200mA off the 5V).

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2 Answers 2

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The quickest and widely used method is to use snap-in standoffs like this:

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(source: digikey.com)

There will be a bit of wobble in such attachment, so the electrical connection is better to be done with a short wire jumper (perhaps with a connector), rather than just poking copper wire through a via in top board to via in bottom board.

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Hex nylon standoffs are popular for mounting PCBs.

They are easy to get, but slightly more work than snap-in standoffs. Essentially they are a threaded 'bolt-on' alternative to snap-in. They come in a few configurations, but you might think of them as very, very long nylon nuts that can be bolted into, or nylon bolts with very large threaded heads.

As venny has explained, the electrical connection might have a connector, e.g. plug and socket, designed to handle some play (alignment and wobble). Looking at the photo, that might not be easy, in which case you might use insulated wire with enough play to allow the boards to be assembled and disassembled. Possibly with ring connecters at one end so that it can be fully disassembled.

Examples of hex nylon standoffs:
Granger
Keystone
Mouser

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