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I need to have my device be able to produce sounds of at least two different frequencies, as loud as possible at around 3/5V. So far it seems like the best thing to go for would be a piezo speaker but the cylindrical case ones are still a little bulky for my needs. I've found some flat piezo speakers too which would be better but they seem to need casing built for them anyway to make them as loud as they can get. Is there any clever acoustical tricks or devices I should be aware of while investigating this issue?

I'm looking for a loudness of around 80dBA @ 1ft (90dBA @ 10cm) and a size of <10mm for all dimensions.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "Loudest" and "smallest" are not engineering requirements. You need to specify a minimum loudness and a maximum size in order to get any meaningful answers. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Sep 16 '14 at 12:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ I wasn't being very specific because usually being extremely picky in my question only caused nobody want to reply. \$\endgroup\$ – Sanuuu Sep 16 '14 at 13:34
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A miniature dynamic buzzer seems to be the most suitable here. An example can be found here at farnell. This is essentially the same thing as those used in mobile phones, which means they can be obtained virtually free of charge (old Nokias have almost the same type as in the link).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Right, the driver itself is tiny. What I'm concerned about is the housing some of them need in order to actually be able to hear them (like to avoid the cancellation of the sound wave from the front of the driver and the back). \$\endgroup\$ – Sanuuu Sep 16 '14 at 11:58

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