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I need to measure the liquid level of LPG through a thick 4000/8000/45000 stationary tank. They already have flowmeters but they are easily tampered. I need to be able to know how much Gas is in the tank (1% tolerance). I found some ultrasonic sensors Online that are designed to work with thick LPG tanks (at least they say) but they do not answer my emails and I was not able to source them.

Does anyone have experience with these sensors? Does anyone know of a sensor that works for such tanks?

If there is some other tamper proof method I could also use that. The floater sensing method is easily tampered so it's not an option.

Thanks.

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pressure gauge at the bottom is no better than any weighing machine, if you want to do it using pressure then use differential pressure sensor, one at the bottom and one at the top then difference is the lpg level, if you want to go for non-invasive type then there is ultrasonic type sensor most widely used for this purpose.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The differential pressure is the best method of determining the level of the tank. It inherently ignores (or automatically compensates for, choose your favorite wording) the change of the gas pressure with temperature. We use Differential Pressure transmitters all over to measure the height of a water column under varying (0 to 450psi) steam loading. \$\endgroup\$ – R Drast May 1 '15 at 10:39
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Use a pressure gauge at the bottom of the tank. Tampering isn't easy, and you should be able to get your 1% accuracy.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The pressure of the gas above the liquid is a strong function of temperature, so this method would require careful temperature compenstation. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Sep 28 '14 at 16:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ The gas pressure could be measured, as well, avoiding the need for temperature compensation. \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Heller Sep 28 '14 at 16:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ That would work. That means your method is really two pressure sensors, one at the bottom and one at the top of the tank. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Sep 28 '14 at 19:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ A high pressure sight gauge may work. \$\endgroup\$ – Optionparty Jan 21 '15 at 0:47

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