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I don't know how ultrasound transducers (transmitters) are made, is it possible to create a home made ultrasound transmitter with a custom specific range 1MHz or more? If it is not, would a 3D printer make it possible (to print parts)?

I don't understand why they cost so much and are very hard to get, from my understanding it is just a piezoelectric crystal.

There is a previous question: Building an Ultrasound Generator but nobody answered, they only posted websites to purchase not make.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Well let me post another website to purchase - $2.2 Euros is NOT "cost so much". Seriously. hobbyking.co.uk/hobbyking/store/… \$\endgroup\$ – KyranF Oct 10 '14 at 18:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Mohamed: what all-important difference between ultrasonic and ultrasound are you alluding to? \$\endgroup\$ – Wouter van Ooijen Oct 10 '14 at 19:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ I too am unsure of your thought process between 'ultrasound' and 'sonic, they are one in the same. Ultrasound is any sound that is greater than the upper limit of human hearing (20 kHz). It would certainly be difficult to make one yourself without specialized machining equipment, considering the level of precision needed... And when you get into the MHz range, it goes to extremely difficult to tune without specialized equipment. \$\endgroup\$ – Jarrod Christman Oct 10 '14 at 20:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ And it is much more than just a piezoelectric transducer, your diaphragm affects your resonance, getting anything mechanical finely tuned in the MHz range is quite difficult. \$\endgroup\$ – Jarrod Christman Oct 10 '14 at 20:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think it's fair that you say I do not know the difference between ultrasonic and ultrasound.. I am glad that you can make 18kHz with your phone, but i'm sure you know that is not ultrasonic either ;) \$\endgroup\$ – KyranF Oct 10 '14 at 21:31
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Ultrasonic transducers in that frequency range are not easy to construct since the resonant element (which usually is fabricated from piezoceramic material) must be very thin and very uniform in thickness and must have conducting electrodes (usually silver or nickel) deposited on two surfaces. At present, 3D printers are not capable of manufacturing such devices as they cannot handle ceramic materials and their accuracy is not good enough at the thicknesses required. However, you can buy reasonably priced transducers by searching online for 1 MHz transducers (e.g. http://www.steminc.com/PZT/en/mist-generation-transducer-16-mhz).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ thank you for your answer i dont know what that entire thread in the comments was for.. thanks \$\endgroup\$ – Mohamad Oct 13 '14 at 14:44

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