4
\$\begingroup\$

Are there standard sizes for solderless breadboards?

For example, My teaching project is currently reaching the capacity limit of a 170 pin (17 x 10) breadboard. Is there a standard "next size larger" I can specify?

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

There are various de facto standard sizes.

Tiny (170 tie points)

enter image description here

Half-sized (400 tie points)

enter image description here

Full-sized (830 tie points)

enter image description here

Larger (with or without doubled power rails)

Double, double rails Quad, single rails, double rails along top

Note that spacing from breadboard to breadboard over a single rail is 700mil.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • \$\begingroup\$ Different vendors have different layout. Some use single power rails along the sides, some have 6 tie points in a row others have 5. I don't think there really is such a thing as standard sizes, rather than vendors setting their own. \$\endgroup\$ – jippie Oct 13 '14 at 5:25
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Sure, some vendors vary from these formats. But if you go into any store that sells breadboards it is extremely likely that they will have one or more of the sizes listed here. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 13 '14 at 5:30
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ A point to note here is that most solderless breadboards, including some "tiny" 170-point boards, are designed to be clipped together to make bigger breadboards. In some cases you can unclip power-rails or clip on extra power-rails. \$\endgroup\$ – RedGrittyBrick Oct 13 '14 at 10:12
0
\$\begingroup\$

The breadboard you show is probably the smallest available. I think the most common size is about 6.5 inches long, and has long power busses along both sides. There may be intermediate sizes, but I have had no reason to look for other sizes.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.