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I came to know that in transmission line if I send only the phase to the houses and make the neutrals to ground then the circuit works. How does the circuit fill up without having any closed contact with the neutrals of both side.

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    \$\begingroup\$ There is contact. Through the ground. This will only work if the two areas of "ground" are continuous and the soil is sufficiently conductive to complete the circuit. If the soil is very dry sand it would not work nearly as well as if you do it with moist loamy soil. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Oct 15 '14 at 16:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ single-wire ground return \$\endgroup\$ – davidcary Aug 17 '17 at 15:32
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As far as I know this is not used widely (if at all), but it should work if your ground connection is close to substation's ground and the soil is conductive enough.

The reason why it is not seen so often is that if the soil dries out you will be left with no electricity at all or very bad connection that appears and disappears randomly.

I suppose it can be used in a land where the soil is always wet to save some money on wires and stuff, but I would call that a bad idea to do...

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    \$\begingroup\$ Actually I hear it's used a lot in some countries by homeowners and business who want to cut electricity bills. If you break the neutral and run it to a ground rod the utility meter doesn't see the energy usage. Power companies are spending a lot of money to come up with ways to detect this. In some areas of the world a single wire with earth return is used for power distribution, though it's not common. \$\endgroup\$ – John D Oct 15 '14 at 16:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ @JohnD, Sounds like a really big GFCI at the meter would do for those utilities. Somebody tries this trick and suddenly they've got no power. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Oct 15 '14 at 16:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Suppose the pole is 20km apart from my house. If I use this process then Should the circuit work?? \$\endgroup\$ – Raihan Khalil Oct 16 '14 at 3:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ It can work, but no guarantee, would be not reliable compared to usual practices. This is what I can guess, though honestly I never seen any data on this type of connection, all books and articles concentrate on usual configurations, all of which have neutral wire to consumer in circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – ScienceSamovar Oct 16 '14 at 5:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ How can anyone avoid running utility meter by connecting in this way?? @JohnD \$\endgroup\$ – Raihan Khalil Oct 16 '14 at 6:35
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Since The phase which is coming from pole to home has Higher potential compare to ground. As we know ground has approximately Zero Potential.

And electric charge flows by means of electrons, from lower to higher electrical potential. so the current will flow from higher to lower potential.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If I don't connect the poles neutral wire to ground then does the circuit work? It should work on the basis of your words. Because in this case there's remain the higher and lower potential condition. \$\endgroup\$ – Raihan Khalil Oct 15 '14 at 16:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ As per the theory it should work.Practically have to check. In my village Neutral was connected to ground 2KM apart and I connected my homes neutral to ground and it was working fine. \$\endgroup\$ – Sanjeev Kumar Oct 15 '14 at 17:01

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