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Some literature talk about cut-in voltage but couldn't find a clear explanation.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you be more specific about your source? \$\endgroup\$ – Barry Oct 23 '14 at 14:54
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It's not an officially recognized term by any standards body, but in the south-eastern United States (and possibly elsewhere) "cut-in" (cut-on) is the colloquial opposite to "cut-off" (cut-out). It is used by many in everyday life in reference to light switches -- "cut-on the lights" = "turn on the lights".

Ergo, this is the informal name for the threshold voltage that is the transition point between the cut-off and active regions of the transistor.

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