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I am trying to refine the design of an audio switch that I built a while ago. Since this is used to connect two inputs (two sound cards) to five possible outputs (speakers, tv, etc) with stereo audio plugs, I am dealing with three circuits. Since finding triple-throw, triple-pole switches is difficult, I was forced to wire the ground directly to all possible outputs (the ground isn't switched) which sometimes causes audible interference. I was therefore wondering, is there a way to control more circuits using simple switches? What if somebody needs to switch four circuits at a time? Or five?

I am a software dev and just beginning with hardware tinkering so please excuse this being so elementary.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You may consider using relays. \$\endgroup\$ – Bruno Ferreira Oct 25 '14 at 9:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ The electronic solution is to use a crosspoint switch (a chip), then the mechanical switches could be as simple as you like. Other than that, Bruno's suggestion is a good one. You can parallel as many relay coils as you need, if one does not have enough contacts. There are bistable relays that just need a pulse to change state and are appropriate for switching audio. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Oct 25 '14 at 9:42
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Search for wafer switches.

They are rotary switches, which used to be available (update : still are!) as pre-built configurations, or in modular form with up to 12 ways on each wafer and as many wafers as you felt like stacking behind the switch body.

A 4-pole 3-way switch is a single wafer, one of the simpler standard configurations.

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