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I need help with creating device that will be able to play sound (can be recorded or from mp3/wav...) at certain time, for example at 8:00PM, 8:15PM; 8:30PM ...until 5:00AM. Device must be powered from battery and must be working for more than 2-3 months. Sound is about max 10 seconds and it should not be loud but also not quiet. I found that for directly recording can be useful ISD1820 but then I need to set relay and clock. Then I found VS1003, and I think that this chip can be able to do that without setting relay and clock. If anyone can help me or know something better I would really appreciate that.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This type of vague question is closed. \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Heller Oct 30 '14 at 14:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ Is the same sound to be played each time? In other words, is 10 seconds of sound storage enough? What kind of quality? Voice? HiFi? Something else? \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Oct 30 '14 at 14:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ low bitrate mp3 or wav, ISD1820 is capable of 10 second record by default \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Valachovic Oct 30 '14 at 15:26
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Instead of using a VS1003 and a micrcontroller, you could do that with just a VS1005G using the internal flash. The VS1005G has internal real time clock, and the player software and the short MP3 file(s) could all fit in the internal 1 megabyte flash. You can also add SD card or external (nand) flash to play longer files. When you are waiting for the RTC alarm, the VS1005 chip just uses a few microamperes.

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The VS1003 or similar module + a RTC Module + a microcontroller like a MSP430 Launchpad or Arduino plus a transistor or two is all you need.

The microcontroller and RTC can work with low voltages, and will be asleep most of the time. Heck, a microcontroller acting as a RTC would work as well.

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As a quick and simple solution, I would personally go for a Raspberry PI with a Real Time Clock module for accurate time keeping: if you want the drift to be maximum 1min at the end of 3 months, that's 7 parts per million which is quite low for standard crystal oscillators. You can also get rid of the RTC module and use a NTP (network time protocol) time keeping instead if your PI is going to be connected to a network at all times.

However, despite the fact that it enables you to use NTP to essentially get your system running forever once plugged in mains, if battery operation is a hard requirement (quite power hungry, it definitely won't run off a reasonable battery for 3 months) you can stick with a RTC with any simple-to-use microcontroller + SD card and MP3 decoder modules (e.g. Arduino + shields).

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    \$\begingroup\$ An RPi isn't really a battery powered solution. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Oct 30 '14 at 14:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ If the battery is not recharged for 3 months, yes since the battery would need to be quite big. \$\endgroup\$ – Mister Mystère Oct 30 '14 at 15:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ Updated my post to account for that, thanks for noting it. \$\endgroup\$ – Mister Mystère Oct 30 '14 at 15:23

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