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Consider the following power supply interface. enter image description here
I'd like to power a number [1,N] of bitcoin miners, 12V, 5A each one. question is:

  1. do red wires must be connected with V+ pins ?
  2. do black wires must be connected with GND ?
  3. if I connect red wire with GND, and black one with COM (equals to V-), is electrically the same thing as 1. and 2. ? This in order to connect 3 more loads.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ In step 3, is "connect red wire with GND" a typo? \$\endgroup\$ – John Honniball Nov 6 '14 at 13:03
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Yes, you should connect red wires to +V in all cases and black wires to GND (or COM in this case, short for COMMON). Inside the power supply, the three COM terminals are connected together, and the three +V terminals are connected together.

Connect the Earth terminal to your mains earth (green/yellow or green wire).

Be sure that your power supply is rated for 12V and at least N times 5A output. Better to have more output current capacity, so that it's not running at full load all the time. Make sure your wires make good contact with the terminals, and the wires are thick enough to carry the current.

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do red wires must be connected with V+ pins ?

Yes, usually in a 2-wire power system with red and black wires, the red wire is the positive one.

That said, electrons are color-blind, so you should consult the documentation of what you're connecting.

do black wires must be connected with GND ?

None of the labels in your picture say "GND".

If you mean COM, then yes, the black wires for your loads probably do connect to the COM pins. But that's just an educated guess; you haven't provided any documentation for these anonymous "bitcoin miners".

If you're calling the round "earth" symbol between the N and COM terminals "GND", it's better to just call it "earth", since "ground" is a pretty generic term. In this case, the earth terminal lets you use 3-conductor wiring for the AC input side. It's separated from the L and N terminals since it's technically optional, though it's probably a good idea to hook it up. In some countries, it may actually be required.

if I connect red wire with GND

...you will probably blow something up. GND probably connects to black, but again, that's a guess, since nothing in what you've provided says "GND".

is electrically the same thing as 1. and 2. ?

Your English isn't too clear, but as far as I can tell, the answer is "no."

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Ground with the circle symbol around it is called protective earth in the European Union and is not anything to do with the power supply output voltages usually.

The power supply shown in your diagram produces a positive DC voltage and 0V (aka common). You can't use the protective earth for anything meaningful other than what it is designed for.

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