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Instead of grounding myself with a bracelet, can I wear rubber gloves? Will this prevent any equipment I touch from getting shocked?

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    \$\begingroup\$ How certain are you that the rubber can't carry a charge? \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 10 '14 at 23:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Maybe if they are nice thick gloves. But dude, why not just ground yourself? \$\endgroup\$ – George Herold Nov 11 '14 at 1:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ The rubber gloves might help in picking up a charge ;-) \$\endgroup\$ – EvertW Nov 11 '14 at 8:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ I know that rubber shoes do! \$\endgroup\$ – EvertW Nov 11 '14 at 8:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ Rubber will make things worse. Rubber is isolating, so able to build up a charge (as it doesn't dissipate). \$\endgroup\$ – RJR Nov 11 '14 at 9:03
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The best way to prevent static shocks is not to try to prevent static discharge, but to ensure safe discharge. Otherwise the charge will just continue to build up until it finds some (unwanted) way of discharging.

Many labs ensure this by using shoes with conductive soles, and a floor that conducts to ground (no pun intended).

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Keeping a healthy relative humidity in your workspace will eliminate the issue. In mid-winter in New Hampshire, a consumer-grade humidifier keeps our 900+ sq-ft space at 33% RH or more, and I haven't zapped a part yet.

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