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I know that the electrical generators have mechanical and electrical power losses. But does electrical or magnetic phenomena in a generator produce a counter torque? Or all the electrical power losses are related to current losses?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ To expound on Olin's answer below - which you should accept - a generator producing power meets the physical needs of a motor producing torque in a direction opposing its rotation. That is, a current carrying conductor in a magnetic field. You can check this out using the right hand rules - with a little practice it's fairly easy to visualize. \$\endgroup\$ – Sean Boddy Feb 16 '15 at 22:30
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Of course having the generator produce electrical power puts a load (torque in opposition to rotation) on the shaft. Without such load, there would be no mechanical power transferred into the generator, and it would violate conservation of energy by producing electrical power.

Electric generators, which can be thought of as mechanical to electrical power converters, can be made reasonably efficient. Good ones are 90% efficient or more. In that case, 90% of the load on the shaft is due to the electrical power produced, and the other 10% is due to losses. These losses include mechanical friction, electrical losses in the wires, and magnetic losses in the core material and due to induced currents in unwanted places.

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