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I'm looking for a particular type of mini SPDT switch, it has 3 poles (if memory serves correct, could be 2 pole) and has 3 total positions. By default it's centered and is set to an off state. If it's toggled up, it remains ON, if it's toggled down, it will function as a momentary and will spring back to the center off position once released.

I'm not sure what this switch is referred to as and have had a heck of a time finding them in electronics hobby stores and even online.

Does anyone know what these switches are referred to as?

Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

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I assume that by "poles" you mean terminals. For electrical switches, "poles" normally refers to the number of circuits that can be switched. An SPDT switch is "Single Pole, Double Throw" and will have three terminals.

You are looking for an SPDT center off switch. To indicate the "momentary in one position" function, the switch would be described as ON-OFF-(ON). This type of switch does exist, but you may have to go to a major distributor like Digikey or Farnell to find one.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the explanation Peter. I searched Digikey and found exactly what I was looking for as per the information you provided. \$\endgroup\$
    – Clu
    Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 5:20
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I think what you're referring to is a SPDT (Single Pole, Double Throw) toggle switch with a switch action of On-Off-Momentary. Indeed, searching for exactly that on, for instance, Digikey turns up over 1000 switches that meet the criteria.

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YES THE 3POLE DT SWITCHES ARE USED IN AIRCRAFT WIRING.FROM OFF STATE TO MOMENTARY STATE IT GIVES DC SUPPLY TO GENERATORS TO ENERGISE FIELD COILS IN CASE FIELD CORE GOT A RESIDUAL REVERSE POLARITY.THEN THE SWITCH IS PRESSED DOWN FOR NORMAL FUNCTION.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Why are you shouting? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 12:25

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