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I need to transform the frequency from 60Hz (220V) to 50Hz (220 or 230V). Alternatively I can use 110V 60Hz for the required output. I'm looking to find cost and space effective solution, it is for build-in coffee machine and build-in microwave appliances bought in Europe (max. 1kW each, can be always used separately). What would do this do the job?

I've seen normal transformers just change the current 110/220V and vice versa, but leave the frequency the same. Since I already have 220V power supply I just need to change the frequency, what appears to be not that easy. I also thought if there would be anything in the appliances inside that would be cheaper to change, but probably that's not the case since these models would not have their US counterparts, although both are Whirlpool. (the biggest problem is the micro, since the coffee machine works, but is a bit 'slower' than it should...)

Can please anyone help?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Check with the microwave manufacture whether it can be operated with a different frequency. In many cases it can. Otherwise it would be cheaper to replace the microwave rather than buying such a converter. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Nov 18 '14 at 20:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ A lot of times I've seen labels that say "50/60 Hz 120/240v" which imply the device can run on 120v at 50 or 60 Hz, or 240v at 50 or 60 Hz; i.e. any of the four combinations. \$\endgroup\$ – tcrosley Nov 18 '14 at 22:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nope, it is 50hz only, and the clock runs faster, which also is caused by the frequency. Since they are build-in equipment their prices run high + custom making the cupboard again for different dimensions... I really would like to solve the problem by some sort of additional device. \$\endgroup\$ – user58576 Nov 19 '14 at 17:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't think this is on topic. But you can google "frequency converter," "AC power supply," "rotary phase converter." Also consider using a DC supply plus an inverter. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Nov 20 '14 at 2:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ It will definitely not be cost effective. Here's a frequency changer that can supply a few watts for a clock: sound.westhost.com/clocks/freq-changer.html \$\endgroup\$ – ntoskrnl Dec 30 '14 at 12:58
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Both your machines use transformers inside to create the required working voltage. Using transformers at 60Hz designed for 50Hz will be no problem. Using one at 50Hz when designed for 60Hz is more troublesome, as the max flux inside the core will be greater than designed.

So for you 60Hz 220-230V is fine. But the electronics inside that measure time were built for 50Hz, so at 60Hz they will run faster. Many electronic clocks use industry standard chips which can be set to either 50 or 60 Hz by soldering a certain pin to ground or not.

Use them, don't worry, just don't trust the clocks.

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If the clocks are the main issue, as I do agree with the other answer, you might simply get a small outlet timer. One used for Christmas lights would work well. It would allow you to have the unit turn on or off in the correct times and is very inexpensive compared to most other solutions.

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protected by Community Jun 7 '16 at 3:19

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