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Is anyone aware of a good linux program for drawing automation schematics? Not PCB design, circuit simulation and fine electronics. Industrial automation.

Example: Example schematic

I looked at a couple of different EDA applications, but did not find any functionality for multiple sheets in a single schematic. I will also need cross-reference symbols to handle nets/symbols that go across multiple sheets.

Perhaps someone knows about an EDA application with multiple sheets and good scripting capabilities to create the cross-reference system?

Solution: I ended up using gschem with some custom scripts for cross-references and titleblock stuff. They can be found here.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ possible duplicate of Good Tools for Drawing Schematics \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Young Nov 20 '14 at 19:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ That thread seems aimed at pcb making and circuit simulation... \$\endgroup\$ – John Nov 20 '14 at 19:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ Like PLC network type diagrams? The handful of guys I know in that area use AutoCAD. \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Young Nov 20 '14 at 19:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes. There are extension for autocad for this purpose. But I am looking for something to run under Linux. Preferably free and open source. \$\endgroup\$ – John Nov 20 '14 at 19:38
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I haven't done this is a very long time (more than 10 years now) but what I used to do to draw cabinet wiring schematics is to use a PCB design tool and build my own custom component library.

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There is a free and open-source CAD package called LibreCAD. It may do what you want, if AutoCAD is what you're expecting.

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There is gEDA for Linux or KiCAD or eagle

All three can do schematic capture & multi-sheet. They equally come with PCB layout (which you say you do not require).

There is also qucs which is a circuit simulation tool and while it will draw circuits, what you draw for simulation is rarely exactly what you draw for schematic capture (no need for decoupling, adding additional components to appease the simulation engine etc...)

My recommendation is kicad as it has a lot of 3rd party symbols available for it

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Eagle software is used by a lot of folks around here and runs on Linux. Although it can do PCB layout, you don 't have to pay for that or the autorouter; the schematic editor is available separately. The standrd version costs $315 and can handle 99 sheets of schematics, with cross-references.

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