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i'm using a peltier device to cool my equipment but it seems not to be effective cause it dissipates too much heat. do you know any other effective cooling device which is very small like peltier. or can you guys help me with the best power supply for my peltier it's power rating is 25W.

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    \$\begingroup\$ @peeps, target temperature for the device you are cooling? is ambient temperature just 70 F? How much power are you dissipating? \$\endgroup\$ – Kortuk May 6 '11 at 11:59
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Are you cooling the other side with a heat sink/fan combo? That's kinda fundamental. It won't cool very well if you aren't drawing heat away from the other side in some way.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ i used a fan and a heat sink to cool the hot side. Is there any other way to cool it? or should I forget about the peltier and get another cooler? if that's the case, do you know any other device which is more effective than peltier? \$\endgroup\$ – peepz May 6 '11 at 4:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ When it is about cooling limited power up to a few hundred watts, there is nothing more efficient than fan cooling, possibly aided by heatpipes in the cooler. I am not aware of a situation where you profit from a peltier element between the heated chip and the cooler, unless you have very special requirements on the temperature of the chip, like, say, a thermal imaging camera. \$\endgroup\$ – posipiet May 6 '11 at 7:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you plan on convection cooling in air, it is fairly simple. Unless you want to get fancy, what matters is the surface area of the heat sink and the velocity of air over the surface. \$\endgroup\$ – morten May 6 '11 at 13:17
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A peltier device does not remove heat. It moves heat from one side of the device to the other side while adding its own power consumption in heat. Therefore, the hot side of a peltier will be hotter than the equipment you want to cool in the first place.

So, no matter what, you will still have to do effective cooling on the warm side of the peltier element.

They only make sense if you did a proper thermal analysis of the situation, and you know the thermodynamic effect. If you do not know usage of a peltier makes sense, it very probably doesn't.

In general, they are mostly used in applications to produce a chill (as in for beverages), if a mechanical heat pump would be to big - in full knowledge of the added power, low efficiency etc - and including proper cooling for the warm side. For cooling electronics - not so much.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ what will be the best source for my peltier? I want to use a dc source. \$\endgroup\$ – peepz May 6 '11 at 4:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ please describe your setup in detail. What chip are you trying to cool with what peltier? \$\endgroup\$ – posipiet May 6 '11 at 5:34
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If you are trying to cool something that's hot, like a chip, you do not need a Peltier; the temperature gradient from the hot device to the cooler environment will naturally cause heat to flow out of the device. To increase the cooling effect, you only need to prevent the heat from the device from warming up the environment around it, which would reduce the gradient. Fortunately, this is easily accomplished with a good thermally bonded heat sink and fan. The Peltier device will actually only increase the amount of heat that must be removed from the system, as it dissipates energy (as heat!) in order to move heat.

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