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I read in a book that "Current always goes in the less resistance path". In a paralel circuit with 1k resistor to one side and 10k resistor to another side the current still goes in both sides. Why does the current goes to both sides? It should only go to the 1k resistor cause there is less resistance.

In the same paralel ciruit, if I add another wire in paralel to the ground all the current will go to the ground, proving that "Current always goes in the less resistance path". But why does this "law" only work when one of the wires is ground?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This question would be a better fit for the Electronics site. \$\endgroup\$ – JRobert Nov 24 '14 at 17:33
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Electricity always tries to go to from a high potential to a low potential through every possible path. The "least resistance" aphorism is shown when one of the resistances is much lower than all of the others, but is still not strictly true; the different resistances create a current divider where the overwhelming amount of current takes a single path. As you've discovered, it no longer holds when the resistances are reasonably comparable.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You are a smart guy @Ignacio! You helped me so much so far. So it's certainly a mith that current flows in the "least resistance" path. \$\endgroup\$ – Samul Nov 23 '14 at 14:13
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Electric charges always tend to move from high electric potential to low electric potential. when there is a potential difference, there will be current flow.

I think the words "Current always goes in the less resistance path" emphasize that the majority current will goes in the less resistance path. That is, if there are several paths the current can flow, then the majority part of the current will flow in the path with the less resistance.

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I = V/R so if voltage source is connected across 1k and 10k resistor, more current will flow through 1k than 10k. So the statement is actually more current flows through least resistance path.

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