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I've bought an Power Bank rated 5v DC 1.0A in it's input but it's extremely slow to charge via USB port, which provides an maximum of 500mA as i read in internet. I have and outlet USB phone charger from samsung rated 5v DC 2.0A in it's output and i was wondering if i can use it to charge my Power Bank.

I'm a complete beginner with electronics and i'm a little afraid of trying it and frying my recently bought power bank.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ i'm sorry... i'm removing my question as i realize it's off-topic \$\endgroup\$ Commented Dec 3, 2014 at 8:59

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You can try. Usually these devices (power banks, etc) has their own regulator circuit built in and will not take more current than required. USB ports can give out 500mA normally. If your power bank charges with 1A, replacing the charger with the wall socket which can provide 2A, the charging will be at its maximum speed at 1A.

A general rule is that just because a DC adapter says 2A it doesn't mean that 2A will actually go through the device. It is not being "pushed" from the adapter but rather "pulled" from the device. The device will allow through what it needs. If it has been set for 1A, the charging will use only 1A from the available 2A.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Anything new should have a current limiting circuit. There were problems a few years back, with Lithium batteries charging too fast, overheating, and even catching fire. Hook the Powerbank to the charger, then power up the charger. Touch the Powerbank with the back of your hand. The Powerbank should get warm: charging batteries are absorbing current. Warm, but NOT HOT. If it gets hot enough to worry you, Disconnect At Once and let it cool down. You may want to try this first with the old charger, to get a "feel" for how warm it gets during charging. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Dec 3, 2014 at 9:19

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