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I have been researching how to transfer electrical power from stationary to rotational part. Some of them showed the means by using slip spring rings like in this website

http://www.luberth.com/analog.htm (under the An Analog & Digital propeller clock section)

But it does not specify how do you actually assemble that?

So how do you connect the slip spring rings in your setup? Do you connect it to the motor's shaft? But only the ground terminal can be retrieved from the motor's rotating shaft? Where can we get the V+? It was not specified in the website. What are other components that are mainly used for this application.

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Slip rings are rings around a shaft (electrically isolated from the shaft) that are contacted by brushes. Generally the brushes are fixed while the rings rotate underneath. It is possible to buy complete slip ring assemblies from some suppliers, but you can always make your own. You can use some short pieces of metal tubing for the rings and plastic rod to insulate the rings from the shaft. Cut a slot in the insulator to route the connections from the other slip rings through - all of the connections must pass inside the slip rings so they do not interfere with the brushes. The brushes can then be made from some sort of a stiff metal sheet - spring steel or brass, perhaps. It needs to be springy enough to keep pressure on the rings.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ How do I connect the slip rings to the brushes? do i need to open the motor? \$\endgroup\$ – Xegara Dec 4 '14 at 7:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ You need to make your own brushes; they have nothing to do with the motor brushes. \$\endgroup\$ – alex.forencich Dec 4 '14 at 9:08
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My company don't use slip rings - they are too noisy for applications we have. We have a stator and rotor coupled magnetically to supply power to the rotor. We also use various methods for retrieving the data namely "optical" for end-of-shaft applications requiring high data rates (>100Mbps), inductive loops for "round-the-shaft" applications up to 100Mbps and radio for applications that are lower data rate and may be needed on applications where rotor and stator have variable distances. If you send me an email I can provide information that isn't really appropriate for putting in answers on this site.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Andy sounds interesting. Links to company info on web may be of value to others. \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Dec 4 '14 at 11:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @RussellMcMahon here it is: rotadata.com/pages/products.php - somewhere on here is a product called "telemetry" - this uses the rotor powered by a HF magnetic field and optical/magnetic/RF data output \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Dec 4 '14 at 12:20

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