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May I use two 16 gauge insulated wire in lieu of one 14 gauge wire for the speakers of a home theater system? Thicker wire is better for the quality of sound (or so do they say). So do two 16 gauge insulated wires provide the same quality of sound as one 14 gauge wire?

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Thinker wire is better for the quality of sound." [citation needed] \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 20 '14 at 20:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ But surely thinner wire contains less oxygen (as there's less room for it), and as we all know less oxygen makes for better sound, doesn't it? So the sellers of oxygen-free copper wires want us to believe. So wouldn't the sound quality increase with smaller wires? \$\endgroup\$ – Majenko Dec 20 '14 at 21:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think Majenko is kidding. Forget about oxygen. Oxygen free wire is a scam. But it is worthwhile to keep the resistance of the wire low. Two 16 gauge wires in parallel will be slightly lower in resistance than one 14 gauge, so go for it. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Dec 20 '14 at 21:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ The reason low resistance is (said to be) important for sound quality is that resistance in the cables reduces the damping factor of the amplifier ie once the speaker cone/voice coil is moving, it acts as a generator and produces a back-emf; the lower the resistance, the better the momentum of the speaker cone can be braked by the load represented by the amp, so the movement of the cone more faithfully follows the signal. \$\endgroup\$ – peterG Dec 20 '14 at 21:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ @mkeith I can, but my imagination is very warped. I see blood. Lots of blood... dripping... dripping... \$\endgroup\$ – Majenko Dec 21 '14 at 10:13
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It is worthwhile to keep the resistance of the wire low. Two 16 gauge wires in parallel will be slightly lower in resistance than one 14 gauge wire. So if you have some reason to believe that 14 gauge is good, two 16 gauge will be just as good.

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