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After the pulse of electricity is used to complete a cycle through the CPU, what happens to it? Is it reused in anyway? Or does it goes straight to the ground wire?

If it is not reused, why not?

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    \$\begingroup\$ A "pulse of electricity" isn't a discrete unit that can be reused, like a lump of coal, or a rabbit. You seem to lack even a basic understanding of what electricity is. Start with the basics, like batteries and light bulbs. \$\endgroup\$
    – Majenko
    Dec 24 '14 at 17:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ A "pulse of electricity" is discrete, comprising a number of discrete charges - electrons - which are quantifiable and measured in units of coulombs. The "pulse of electricity" is also quantifiable and can be measured by the amount of work it does in transporting charge, in units called "joules". \$\endgroup\$
    – EM Fields
    Dec 24 '14 at 18:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ So, @Majenko, how would someone reuse a rabbit? Oh, wait, I don't wanna know. Forget I said anything... \$\endgroup\$
    – Ricardo
    Dec 24 '14 at 19:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Ricardo Carefully. Very very carefully. And with plenty of mayonnaise. \$\endgroup\$
    – Majenko
    Dec 24 '14 at 19:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ @EMFields By not a discrete unit I mean not something you can pick up and put somewhere else. It's not an object in its own right, but a change of state of another system. Unless you fancy sending me a tin of electric pulses... to have with my rabbit? \$\endgroup\$
    – Majenko
    Dec 24 '14 at 19:24
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This question can not be answered because "electricity" is not a physical quantity. There is no such thing as a pulse of electricity. What units would you propose to measure this "electricity" in?

This is like asking how much weather it takes to make a foot of snow. The whole question simply makes no sense.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, I'll go read up on the basics as suggested \$\endgroup\$
    – user22979
    Dec 24 '14 at 18:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ "How much weather it takes..." Good analogy, Olin :) \$\endgroup\$
    – bitsmack
    Dec 24 '14 at 18:49
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If one imagines the switching elements in a processor or other such device as being buckets, it's possible to switch a bucket to a "full" state by letting water flow from the supply into the bucket, or switch a bucket to an "empty" state by letting water flow from the bucket into a catch-basin. The water is neither created nor destroyed, but it will end up with less energy than it had before it was used to fill a bucket and then subsequently drained. In order for the water to be able to fill buckets again, some sort of external power source must lift it up again, since in the absence of a direct motivating force, water will only flow from an area of higher pressure/elevation to an area of lower pressure.

Likewise, switching a logic gate will entail the gate either allowing current to flow from one supply rail into the gate, or from the gate to the other supply rail. Each time a gate switches low then high then low, or vice versa, the amount of charge required to fill or empty it will end up being allowed to flow from one supply rail to the other; the electrons will have less energy afterward than before, so an external source of energy will be needed to make them repeat the trip.

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Generally, after it does its job, it dissipates its remaining energy as heat and disappears as an entity.

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