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BAM! Just like that I came across Cypress PSoCs. I'm from software background so started trying to understand more about them and the more I learn about PSoCs the more I'm getting attracted to it.

What I've understand so far is that - there is a lot of flexibility and designing a product using PSoCs, their IDE and so on is both very easy and effective.

But one thing I would like to understand is, let's say:

  1. I've bought CY8CKIT-030 PSoC® 3 Development Kit and CY8CKIT-025: PSoC Precision Analog Temperature Sensor Expansion Board.

  2. I interface the two, I write an application which will run on the PSoC 3 8051 micro controller, read the temperature from the sensor using a PSoC ADC and finally display it on the LCD.

  3. I'm satisfied and I've proved that my concept works. I'm done with the eval kits. I've successfully designed a micro-controller, on the basis of my needs.

  4. I would like to now build a product out of it, say I wish to make 100000 temperature measurement/display devices.

What should I do? What are the next steps? Do I need to place an order to Cypress: I need 100000 processors with the following requirements and here are the design files for my micro-controller? What's the price for 100000 such processors?

From their website/videos all I see is them talking about kits, capsense and the ease of designing. I would like to know more on what's after the kits and the end of design phase.

Kindly explain.

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closed as too broad by Chris Stratton, Voltage Spike, Finbarr, RoyC, PeterJ Mar 29 '18 at 9:31

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It's a big jump from a development board proof of concept, to offering 100kchips. \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Young Jan 9 '15 at 2:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah big jump :). If you're just talking parts at that volume you'd probably just order from a distributor. You can pay them to program or you can program yourself. Prices go down as you buy more etc. Making the actual product out of those chips is a whole nother story... \$\endgroup\$ – Some Hardware Guy Jan 9 '15 at 2:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ Check out this post for some more detailed answers about going from proto to production. electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/42840/… \$\endgroup\$ – Some Hardware Guy Jan 9 '15 at 2:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ This question is far too broad to be specifically answerable - in effect, you have the entire "how do I make a custom MCU-based product" here. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 28 '18 at 16:56
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I'm currently in the same situation as you. As for the legality of using PSOC's as components I would imagine it's the same as an arduino, and it's just a 'component'. (I started a thread on the cypress forums asking about this, still waiting for a solid response) https://community.cypress.com/thread/32917

As for asking about price, that's something you will have to search for to get the best price, maybe even phoning and talking to suppliers to try to haggle those better deals at lower volumes.

If you're a student or alumni see if your university (or even others) have business development programmes. I myself am enrolled in one such program and the support and resources available make a world of difference.

Don't underestimate the power of networking!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This isn't really a meaningful answer, and likely cannot be made one, as the question is too broad to be answerable. There also appears to be some confusion here (and perhaps in the original question as well) about the distinction between a Microcontroller which today is an integrated circuit, verses the Printed Circuit Board or module hosting one. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 28 '18 at 16:55

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