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The connector on the left is a standard BNC, but could someone please tell me what the connector on the right is? enter image description here

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It looks like an N type connector: -

enter image description here

Here's a picture of a BNC to N type converter (male and female versions): -

enter image description here

Taken from here

Here's a wiki link

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the link to the converter, how did you know ;) \$\endgroup\$ – Tim Mottram Jan 13 '15 at 14:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ I use them now and then. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jan 13 '15 at 14:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ Any issues with power through the BNC? It will be passing upto 250W..? \$\endgroup\$ – Tim Mottram Jan 13 '15 at 14:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't use them for power applications - just for connecting to an old spectrum analyser - according to the wiki link the N type OK for 5kW at 20MHz and 500W at 2GHz. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jan 13 '15 at 14:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do not use a BNC connector at 250W.....but it actually depends on your frequency. N-type will likely be able to handle whatever you can throw at it. (I'm assuming that, because you're asking, you don't have a 2 GHz 1KW CW amplifier lying around). \$\endgroup\$ – scld Jan 13 '15 at 18:26
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It looks like an N connector here is an image of a similiar looking N Female Solder Chasis Mount Connector - RG58:

enter image description here

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Looks like an N type coaxial to me

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N_connector

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