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What is the capacitance and/or inductance of a single straight piece of copper wire? I know the answer is on Wiki, but I need for the answer to be supported. I know that Wiki provides references, but I can not get to the references. I am don't have access to the IEEE data base or any other such scholarly database or web site. I actually need a scholarly paper or text book reference such as by J.D. Jackson. I have been out of school for a long time (3 years) and I am still trying to finalize my thesis without having the needed reference resources.

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    \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka: Every conductive object has some amount of "free space" capacitance, which is evaluated by pretending that the other plate is an infinitely-large sphere. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Jan 22 '15 at 13:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka: You're not helping him by making statements that you know are false. Clearly, he wants to calculate what that capacitance is, and stating that it's zero is completely misleading. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Jan 22 '15 at 13:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ Wait...so you have some homework and the professor won't let you use Wikipedia as a reference, so you thought you'd ask a bunch of random people on the internet, and use that as a reference? I think you are missing the point... \$\endgroup\$ – Phil Frost Jan 22 '15 at 14:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Phil - no, the quest is not for random internet personalities to be references, but rather to point to references which are obtainable (and presumably evaluatable by traditional means) \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jan 22 '15 at 15:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ you don't really need to cite anything on IEEE for such a thing. I'd dare to say that depending on the paper angle and subject you can probably write down the equations without any citation. Or you're going to cite Newton everytime you make a derivative? \$\endgroup\$ – Vladimir Cravero Jan 22 '15 at 17:42
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The formula for inductance of a straight piece of wire is given in the following link which also includes references:

http://chemandy.com/calculators/round-wire-inductance-calculator.htm

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  • \$\begingroup\$ A link-only answer is dangerous because the link could be changed tomorrow and leave the answer with no value. It would be better if you could summarize the important content within the answer itself. \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Sep 10 '19 at 12:46
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The answer can be found in this document http://k9axn.com/_mgxroot/page_10920.html

The equation is in two forms, one in CM and one in feet. The formatting for CM and feet is on page 585 and both equations on 586 for vertical and horizontal wires.

A pre calculated and the K factor chart are on P.609. It is a simple formula to use.

Note on the pre calculated chart that the height above ground makes far less difference than most think.

As for the inductance formulas, you will find on WIKO, several different equations. If you are working with antennas and displacement current, you need to define your intent because the inductance and capacitance in an antenna or transmission line combine to appear as non reactive impedance.

Regards Jim

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