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I got my hands on 35 MHz analog oscilloscope. I'm trying to learn how to use it. Is there something that can be seen with a scope like this on an Ardiuno board? Clock signal maybe?

The board I'm using: http://arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardDuemilanove

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    \$\begingroup\$ The Duemilanove uses the ATmega168 MCU. This MCU has a USART module that you could setup and get that guy to spit out some bytes every couple seconds or so. That way, you could learn to use the "trigger" function on the scope, and learn about USART at the same time. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 23, 2015 at 21:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ Easier (i think) than that, just take some ready LED blinking code, change it's frequency to be somewhat faster, and probe the involved pins. \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    Commented Jan 23, 2015 at 21:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Generate a PWM signal and observe it with the scope. Set different frequencies and duty cycles in the code. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 23, 2015 at 21:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ You should be able to see 16MgHz on pin 9 and 10 of the ATmega. It won't be full 5V, be that it is from the XTAL and will be sinusoidal. \$\endgroup\$
    – mpflaga
    Commented Jan 23, 2015 at 22:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ @mpflaga directly probing the XTAL is generally not a good idea; the probe will load the XTAL such that it will either oscillate at the wrong frequency, or possibly even stop oscillating all together. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 23, 2015 at 22:15

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You can use anything that generates changing signal. The easiest source is crystal oscillator (see picture below showing the probe points on Duemilanove). Don't forget to connect your ground. Probing may stop the oscillator, in this case power cycle the board.

You may want to generate something and see how it looks. For example, follow this tutorial, make a LED fade then connect your scope to the LED and observe how the duty ratio is changing.

In this manner you can see any signal.

enter image description here

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