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I want to build a simple electric geyser* as my college project. I would appreciate if someone helps me in this. I need a guidance about how I should make it, what principle I should use, what material I should use. I don't need a high-tech geyser. I just need a simple geyser which can be made easily and works(heats the water).

*Otherwise known as an instantaneous domestic water heater.

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closed as too broad by Scott Seidman, ThreePhaseEel, Voltage Spike, Daniel Grillo, Dave Tweed Nov 29 '16 at 17:40

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Something that spews out superheated steam and boiling water? (Sounds dangerous.) How about a nice fountain? \$\endgroup\$ – George Herold Jan 25 '15 at 14:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ @GeorgeHerold No man, you didn't get it. I'm asking about a geyser which we use in our bathrooms to heat the water in winters to take bath with. \$\endgroup\$ – Gurpreet Jan 25 '15 at 14:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ Since this project will require mains power I don't recommend doing it less you have some experienced supervision. Never the less, using a boiler and some control circuitry could do it, but again, if the circuit stuffed up you could get electrocuted or scalded. \$\endgroup\$ – geometrikal Jan 25 '15 at 14:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ @geometrikal It's not so that I buy a boiler from market and connect it with the circuitry. I am to make my own stuff. I mean I am supposed to construct a simple and small geyser (working model) by myself. In case of boiler, I'm supposed to build a boiler myself instead of buying one from the market. Can you suggest me how I can build a small geyser? \$\endgroup\$ – Gurpreet Jan 25 '15 at 15:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ To clarify, "geyser" is a well known term in British English, and presumably Indian English, but not American English - for an 'on demand water heater'. \$\endgroup\$ – peterG Jan 25 '15 at 19:51
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It depends how small is acceptable.
If very small is OK you could use a low voltage DC power supply.
Or a soldering iron as heater.

At low voltage you can use eg Nichrome wire or tape wound around a heating tube.

If you can accept very hot near-boiling water and not steam it is "very easy" to get a controlled output by having water flow into a small mixing tank before exiting, heating the tank with immersion or clamp on heater and then monitoring tank temperature or exit temperature with a thermostat and controlling the heating energy.

For a toy or demo system the tank need not be closed or pressurised.
eg you can have a tank that water flows into, swirl mixes and then leaves via an overflow. Monitor tank temperature and adjust.

If you better define variables as above better suggestions can be made.

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There is no good reason offered for making this DIY so far.

My strong advice is not to make a pressurised hot water system without the required skills and testing and certification for pressure vessels. Same again for mains electricity in conjunction with water.

Using a hot water cistern and gravity feed for the water is a option that can be done with a hot water urn and a hot water float valve. It will still have some skill required and safety with electricity around water is important, hot water is a danger and water leaks or overflows can cause property damage. The urn is not intended to overflow.

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I would say that is extreemly dangerous to do. But a hot plate and a kettle would give you a start. Use a metal tube from the spout to the top of the geyser.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm not asking about the geyser in the earth. I'm asking about the geyser(electric appliance) that we use in our homes to heat the water to take bath in winters. \$\endgroup\$ – Gurpreet Jan 25 '15 at 14:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Im sorry i misunderstood. Im used to helping with science projects. Id have to look up the appliance to help any more but will be glad to give my thoughts on making it. \$\endgroup\$ – James Jan 25 '15 at 14:47

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