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The Fluke 732A has among 10V and 1V references also a 1.018V reference (whereas the 10V is the "main" references and the others are formed by resistive voltage dividers).

While having multiple reference voltages is surely convenient, why exactly 1.018V? Some references have a \$2^N*10^M V\$ value, which makes somewhat sense for ADCs to better have steps of \$10^K V\$, but why exactly 1.018V here, what is the significance of this value?

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That is approximately the voltage produced by a Weston cell, a highly stable electrochemical cell historically used for calibrating voltages. The voltage has been retained so that comparisons can remain accurate even though the cell itself is no longer popularly used.

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