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I am building a new robot, it's a little bit heavy, so it's hard to find a motor that can push it. I am thinking of a way to use machines at home (I have two options: Automatic hair drying machine and drill machine (I have 220v one)) to get the motor inside to move it.

The problem I am facing here is that I need to use battery. Can I hack the motor somehow to find a solution ( i though of using 5 batteries 24v in series, but it's not an option for me as it would make it very heavy ).

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    \$\begingroup\$ You CAN use some kind of DC-AC voltage inverter (google it), but it really sounds to me like a bad idea... \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    Feb 9 '15 at 19:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't have a lot of options here, getting a new dc motor would take some time, the thing I don't have. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 9 '15 at 20:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Getting an inverter will take more, believe me. Even without considering the control... \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    Feb 9 '15 at 20:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Inverters should be quite readily available - they are commonly used in boats and RVs to provide AC. There are low-power units that can plug into a car's lighter outlet. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 9 '15 at 21:06
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Hmm, you have a motor that's designed for 220V, and you don't want to stack up the batteries to match that. I suppose you could take all the wire out of the motor and rewind it, but by the time you finish that, you could have bought one to match your battery.

Assuming, contrary to your statement, that you're okay with stacking batteries, cheap AC tools and appliances might actually work pretty well. The key here is the "universal motor". Basically, it's a DC motor just like you'd expect, with coils that rotate and take power via brushes and a commutator, except that the permanent magnets in the stator are replaced with more coils. This makes it run the same direction regardless of electrical polarity, which means that they can also work on AC. And they can still change direction by flipping either the stator's polarity or the rotor's, but not both. Thus, a reversing AC drill might be a good donor for an easily reversing, high-voltage DC motor.


Better idea:

Make it lighter. Attack it with a drill, sawzall, or whatever. Just get rid of as much material as you can without compromising the structural integrity where it's needed. It'll be more agile that way, in addition to using less power and extending battery life. (or you could use a smaller battery, which would make it lighter still)

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