5
\$\begingroup\$

Is cyanoacrylate adhesive ("superglue") conductive?

I need to repair some USB housings and I want to be sure any "overdrip" won't short the connection.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ No, but if a conductor gets the stuff on his hand before picking up his baton, he won't have to worry about dropping it. (Be extra careful to protect nearby surfaces and make sure the main piece is secured somehow as you work on it. It's very easy to get a drop of the stuff on your hand and end up dragging the workpiece halfway across the room before you realize. Or you might get the stuff on your hands and "imprint" half the furniture in the room before you realize it.) \$\endgroup\$
    – Hot Licks
    Feb 18, 2015 at 19:23

5 Answers 5

3
\$\begingroup\$

No, CA glues are not conductive. They're really just a polymer just like any other plastic.

The bigger concern would be getting glue on the contacts that would prevent a good connection.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Cyanoacrylate adhesive ("unfilled" that is without carbon oder metal particle filling) is typically not conductive. You do not need to be afraid of short circuits.

There might however be issues of long term corrosion if the glue interacts with wiring on the printed ciruit board. While I cannot find any solid evidence on this (other than entries in various newsgroups with no scientific backing), GlobalSpec explicitely lists "Non-corrosive Cure Cyanoacrylate Adhesives", at least suggesting that there might be types cyanoacrylates that show corrosive behaviour during curing and/or later use.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Cyanoacrylate is actually announced as a protection against corrosion and oxidation, because it prevents contact with water, oxygen, etc. It is recommended by its manufacturers for metal bonding, so I don't think it is a problem. \$\endgroup\$
    – gstorto
    Feb 18, 2015 at 8:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I hear both. I am checking back with a colleague and will change the answer if it turns out to be wrong. Thank's! \$\endgroup\$
    – Ghanima
    Feb 18, 2015 at 8:52
2
\$\begingroup\$

While normal 'superglue' isn't conductive and won't cause shorts, I've had trouble in the past with superglue vapor causing non-conductive deposits on nearby contacts.
Since you're planning to repair connectors you'll need to be aware of this if you suddenly find that they're not connecting as well as they used to ...

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ this is a very important property of CA adhesives. They can have many nasty side effects in electronics such as creeping, diffusion into sensitive parts, so they are usually avoided in electronics manufacturing unless the type of glue and process are very carefully evaluated. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ariser
    Jul 5, 2016 at 13:54
2
\$\begingroup\$

A little further proof/information Loctite Tak Pak 444 is basically cyanoacrylate, and it's marketed specifically for electronics. I've been using it for years doing exactly what you're talking about, and it's definitely not conductive. It's also the preferred rework adhesive at several of our CMs.

enter image description here

Oh and if you're doing a bunch of this kind of rework the accelerator makes it dry in only a few minutes.

\$\endgroup\$
-2
\$\begingroup\$

Might consider Glass Block Sealant (tube for caulk gun) , it is (actually was) non-corrosive (no ammonia like in other caulk) and non conductive the last time I procured this sealant. Was available at Home Depot by the tube, last time I checked a couple years ago, only available by the Case at Home Depot. Amazon you can buy it by the tube. Pittsburgh Corning Corp. 11133 10.3 Oz Glass Sealant. $12.96 per tube.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ This does not answer the OP's question. Offer options AFTER answering the OP's question. \$\endgroup\$
    – user105652
    Jul 1, 2016 at 3:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please describe, why you favour your suggestion over OP's suggestion. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ariser
    Jul 1, 2016 at 11:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.