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This question already has an answer here:

Some suppliers recommend to use the original micro-usb cables for usage with there device. One example is syncing via Samsung Kies. I also exerienced that some devices seem to be realy sensitive to the cable used.

Where are the diffences comeing from (e.g. shielding, capacity, resistance)? Are different 'quality classes' for micro-usb cables defined? When I want to by a new cable, how can I be sure that it will work with all devices?

I'm more concerned about the Quality of data transfer, than on the chargeing time.

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marked as duplicate by Ricardo, Daniel Grillo, Scott Seidman, Nick Alexeev Mar 2 '15 at 5:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ The USB specification imposes requirements on cables. I am not up-to-date on USB 3.0, but any USB 2.0 cable should work OK with USB 2.0 devices. My suggestion is to look for cables that specifically say "USB 2.0" on them. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 26 '15 at 16:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/156278/… This question has an answer that goes over 2 reasons a certain usb cable could work better with a device than others. In the end, any usb cable will work with your device, but charge time might vary. \$\endgroup\$ – I. Wolfe Feb 26 '15 at 16:57
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A long time back I had to do some research on USB cable quality, but this was for USB at 2.0 HS or 480Mbps. Basically we took a large selection of the cables available on the market and used a TDR to measure their impedance, reflections etc. What we found was most cables were in spec, and worked fairly well. Some of the worse cables had multiple impedance discontinuities along their length or were right at the edges of the cable spec.

But really I didn't see too much difference in their performance. However... the SERDES for HS USB, and now USB 3.0 are not trivial to design. The IP is expensive to buy, the lower cost vendors do not necessarily provide the silicon providers with a quality solution.

That means to you that often I have seen devices that the developers have tuned to work after much frustration with the correct length, or just a particular cable. In their lab they know they have seen problems with perhaps very short cables or very long cables for instance (I've seen both). So the simplest thing to do is to put in the manual "Use the cable we recommend", and if you don't they're not liable for any support.

As far as I know there are no "classes" other than maybe this cable is USB 2.0 HS certified or 3.0 certified. Unless you are going to test before or after you buy I would say your best bet would be to stick with a brand you recognize. Really I don't think you'll have much problems unless you're trying to buy no-name cable off E-Bay or something. Even then if you test it you might be surprised at how well it works.

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There are four aspects that can affect the overall quality of a usb cable.

  1. The connectors and cable quality. Bad cables might have corroded contacts or loose connectors meaning no well fitting connections. This includes internally broken cables, or cables too long for spec.

  2. Lack of proper shielding. Allows interference.

  3. Small gauge, high resistance power cables, prevent high speed charging. Sometimes shielding needs to be connected to ground on one end to high speed charge as well.

  4. The quality of the data pair. Bad quality can restrict proper bandwidth or packet failure rates.

Generally, oem cables for devices have tighter specs and quality assurance, preventing all these issues.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You should add, 5. The quality of the USB circuit being attached to. For high-speed data, the physical details of connector and PCB layout matter a lot. A marginal device will show sensitivity to otherwise minor differences in cable characteristics. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Feb 26 '15 at 20:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @what only for devices that are in line usb cables. While yes pcb design is important to differential busses like usb, the question is purely about cables. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Feb 26 '15 at 20:04
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There is one other reason manufacturers say to use their cable. During radiated emissions testing, they may only be able to pass with a cable that has certain properties. If they supply a cable and say only to use it, it will be tested with that cable. For example, you may find some devices that ship with a USB cable with a ferrite molded into one side. I think this applies more to full speed devices (sometimes called USB 1.1 devices).

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