2
\$\begingroup\$

How to hold two breadboards together in a way that they dont take apart so I can put them in my car easily and go on travel?

There are so many wires between them

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ In addition to the answers given, some breadboards have dedicated slide-in nub/slit pairs specifically for this purpose (example). Of course, on rough roads, you'd need to secure them against "shearing" in the Z axis, but any relatively snug container would solve that problem. \$\endgroup\$ – mikołak Mar 15 '15 at 13:35
3
\$\begingroup\$

You could mount both breadboards on a common plate. This could be almost anything - metal, plastic, wood. Adhesive velcro works well for holding the breadboards to the plate.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would avoid attaching breadboards to a metal plate. The metal does funny things to the circuit by adding a lot of capacitance to the nodes of the board and also increases the possibility of cross coupling between adjacent nodes. Even if you ignore these effects the board should still have an insulator on the bottom that is above the metal. \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Mar 15 '15 at 6:25
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Metal is what all of the commercial panels of multiple breadboards seem to be. I've been using these for several decades with no problems. If I'm working with a low - level analog circuit, I'll ground the plate to my circuit. In addition, adhesive velcro is pretty darned insulating. \$\endgroup\$ – Dwayne Reid Mar 15 '15 at 6:36
2
\$\begingroup\$

One way to handle this problem is to attach the multiple breadboards to a suitable sized piece of thin plywood.

If your breadboards look like this then it is obvious how to fasten the breadboards to the plywood with some short machine screws.

enter image description here

On the other hand if your breadboards look more like these then the easiest way to get them to stay in place on the plywood is to apply a bead of hot melt glue along the sides in the corner down next to the plywood.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ The breadboards in your second example are often supplied with a self-adhesive backing which helps with attaching them to a common surface without hot glue \$\endgroup\$ – Bojangles Mar 15 '15 at 13:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.