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I have solved this problem assuming an ideal diode model, but now I'm required to use the \$0.7\$V constant voltage model. If the same circuit in ideal model had both \$D_1\$, \$D_2\$ conducting, does that mean in constant voltage model \$D_1\$ and \$D_2\$ will conduct?

I solved for \$D_1\$ first, assumed that it's OFF, and then calculated the voltage difference between anode and cathode. That gave me \$0.733\$V so I assume it's supposed to be ON (conducting).

Solution here:

enter image description here

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If the same circuit in ideal model had both \$D_1\$, \$D_2\$ conducting, does that mean in constant voltage model \$D_1\$ and \$D_2\$ will conduct?

Need not be.

I see a few mistakes in the solution you have given here:

  1. In the KVL, you missed one DC source. There are two voltage sources (+5V and -5V) in the loop.

  2. The value of \$I_1\$ will be in milli-amps (0 ~ 1mA).

  3. Voltage at node B is not \$5k \times I_1\$. It is \$5 - 5k \times I_1\$

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