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Is nrf24l01+ from Nordic Semiconductors FCC certified ? It is hard to find out from their datasheet whether FCC approved ? Is it FCC approved ?

If it is approved and I use it in my PCB and control it via my ARM cortex processor, do I need to get the entire PCB board FCC approved ?

Also, I am using sierrra wireless HL series modem chip which is FCC approved. This will also be on my PCB. So, do I have to get my PCB FCC approved again although my modem is FCC approved ?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Dont't you have to get FCC approval for any electronic device you market? \$\endgroup\$ – JimmyB Mar 27 '15 at 11:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ If I remember correctly, FCC approval doesn't work like thet. They don't approve an IC which then gets used inside another product, they approve the whole product. The only way around that it to use an FCC approved module, which typically includes the RF IC, antenna and some minimum number of other bits to make it a functional module. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Mar 27 '15 at 12:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ electronics.stackexchange.com/a/165399/30062 might be relevant \$\endgroup\$ – David May 2 '15 at 20:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ electronics.stackexchange.com/a/134570/30062 might also be relevant \$\endgroup\$ – David May 2 '15 at 21:01
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The nrf24l01+ is an IC. The FCC does not certify IC's. If you search around, you can probably find an FCC approve module that uses that particular IC. For small quantities, this may be a very cost effective way to go until FCC certification is in your budget.

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Contact them ask them if it's approved and ask for its FCC id number. Yes you need FCC testing for your device combo but having the the module already approved will make it easier.

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The IC itself cannot be FCC approved. To avoid tens of thousands of dollars in certification costs you can use a pre-certified nRF24L01+ module such as www.taloncom.com/NordicRFmodules.htm so that like your Sierra Wireless Module you place a label on your final product that states "Contains FCC ID...". You will still have to pay for FCC testing for the unintentional radiator i.e. the non radio frequencies above 9KHz but this is far less costly than certifying your entire product as an intentional radiator as Talon and Sierra have done.

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