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Please suggest a simple digital solution for an equalizer implementation. I am not looking for any feature heavy DSP based IC, since my application only requires some minor adjustments on the bass and treble notes, for improving instrument clarity.

A simple but compatible-for-audio microcontroller can do this job I believe. Finding really tough to adjust even minute parameters in analogue-ish manner.

Thanks

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Any microcontroller can do signal processing for audio filtering, but different products are optimised for different applications. The appropriate solution will depend on various aspects of your audio signal including:

  • sample rate (kHz)
  • resolution (number of bits)
  • filter complexity
  • cost (development time vs product cost)

Because filtering requires a lot of multiplying, and the resolution/dynamic range of audio is fairly large, most applications tend to use a microcontroller with a fast multiplier or a DSP which often can complete several multiplies in a single cycle.

For example, TI provide some information on the practicality of FIR filtering using the popular MSP430 controller, which might give you an idea of what is practicable. However, this is just one possibility, so you will need to do some research to find a suitable solution, and/or add more details about your project.

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Suggestions for specific products is outside of the allowable scope of this site We are allowed to make general suggestions but not for specific products.

However, any microcontroller that can do as you ask is going to be either a small DSP or a large microcontroller.

Why do you want to convert the analog signal to digital in the first place? Standard analog tone-control circuits work quite well. And there are a lot of options available: you can build tone controls from discrete components or use one of the many chip-level tone control or audio-EQ chips that are available.

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