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There are 2 groups of resistors that look like they might be parallel, but in between them that's making me question if they actually are. The circuit looks like this:

enter image description here

If they are considered parallel, how would I take into account the resistor in between them?

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    \$\begingroup\$ All the answers are good, just remember: when nothing seems to work stick to the basics. Definition of parallel: same voltage across. Definition of series: same current through. \$\endgroup\$ – Vladimir Cravero Apr 6 '15 at 9:05
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Same circuit drawn differently.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Additional ways to think about the circuit.

schematic

simulate this circuit

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Yes, they are in parallel. Just try redrawing it so that both series legs have vertical resistors.

In effect, there is 30 ohms in parallel with 60 ohms.

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That circuit has series and parallel resistors. The answer to the circuit equivalent resistor is : R=((25+5)//(50+10))+5

Where: // means parallel + means series

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The 10 and 50 pair is in parallel with the 25 and 5 pair. You could put the 25 resistor just above the 5. The important thing to retain is "Do not mess with the intersections"!

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